Inking King Kong

If you thought I was picking a favorite in the Godzilla vs Kong debate when I inked Godzilla last week, you were — well, you were right, actually. I picked Godzilla. But Run Red Run insists King Kong’s gonna win.

KingKong_process01

So, instead of agreeing to disagree, we dredge up the subject one more time while I ink Kong. Let them fight. -v

Inking Ratigan (from The Great Mouse Detective) and Talking About Vincent Price

The title pretty much covers it. I inked another Disney Villain — this time, the insidious Professor Ratigan from The Great Mouse Detective.

Ratigan_process01

And, if you’ve seen the movie, you’re well aware the character is voiced by the amazing Vincent Price, one of the great horror actors of the 20th Century.

Ratigan_process02

So Run Red Run and I used my inking practice as an excuse to talk about our favorite Vincent Price movies. Here you go:

 

Inking Godzilla

I’ve always preferred human-sized monsters to giant, building-sized monsters, but…whatever. To each his own. I still had fun inking this Godzilla.

Godzilla_processblog01

Michelle (Run Red Run) and I talked about Godzilla movies, the old Godzilla cartoon, and some other Godzilla-adjacent subjects during this very short process video.

Godzilla_processblog02

It’s a quick illustration done with the Pilot Shinpitsu Pocket Brush Pen and inkwash. Nothing too elaborate, and it kind of explains itself but, basically, I inked in the basic linework with the Pilot Shinpitsu, then slopped on an ink/water mix with a brush.

Godzilla_processblog03

If you feel like killing five minutes, here’s the video:

Inking The Phantom of the Opera

I forgot Run Red Run and I made this video! I use the very-new-to-me ink wash technique to ink up this sketch of Lon Chaney as The Phantom of the Opera.

PhantomProcess1

But, like I said, this video was made months ago — before the pandemic, before social distancing and quarantine. And before I had a chance to practice a lot of ink wash. So at one point in the video I almost blow the whole thing by spattering ink all over the place and panicking (as seen below).

PhantomProcess2

I think, in the end, I pulled it all together and got a decent result. But you can judge for yourself. In the video, Run Red Run and I discuss ink wash and Lon Chaney. -v

Haunted Mansion Bride (and Hatbox Ghost Bonus) Process Video

Yikes, what a weird week. I’m quarantined in my home studio, my friend RunRedRun is quarantined elsewhere, so we haven’t been able to work on any new videos. Here’s one of the handful we got in the can before the quarantine: The Haunted Mansion’s Black Widow Bride, with a bonus backup of her pal, the Hatbox Ghost. Hope everyone’s staying safe and healthy.

Scooby Doo’s Space Kook : Trying Out Ink Wash

Hey, if you’ve been following these short process videos I’ve been putting up with my friend RunRedRun, maybe you saw us ink a werewolf earlier this week.

Werewolf_thumb

But this past Thursday, we had fun trying out ink wash technique for the very first time with a quick illustration of Scooby Doo’s creepiest monster, The Spooky Space Kook!

Scoob_spacekook_thumb

How did it all turn out? You can watch the video below and decide for yourself. In just six or seven minutes RunRedRun and I manage to squeeze in quick conversations about inking, Scooby Doo, and Star Trek while I work.

Reviewing the Pilot Shinpitsu Bristle Brush Pens (and inking a Sleestak)

Yeah, maybe I buried the lede. I inked a Sleestak from The Land of the Lost with the Pilot Shinpitsu Bristle Brush Pens. I liked ’em. But if you wanna see ’em in action, just check out the video. And, besides the pen review, RunRedRun and I talk about ’70s Sci-Fi Kids TV hit, The Land of the Lost because why not?

PilotPens

Inking The Mummy

Time for another 6-minute video where I ink a monster and RunRedRun and I talk about stuff. This time, it’s mummies. Are they scary? What are their monster powers? Spoiler alert: We have no idea. But here’s me inking one anyway (with PIGMA Brush Pens and PITT Artist Pens).

Inking The Headless Horseman

I’ve been trying to upload some quick inking/making videos on YouTube lately that show my process (albeit, at breakneck speeds). So here’s the latest. Seven-and-a-half minutes of inking the Headless Horseman while gabbing about our favorite versions of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

Happy Halloween (ten months early). -v

After-School Project: Making a Werewolf Paper Doll with Clip Studio Paint

I have a friend who is a grade school teacher and is always looking for creative activities for the kids in her after-school program. So every once in a while I make her a paper doll the kids can color, cut-out, and assemble. Since I did this near Halloween, I decided on a kid-friendly werewolf. And to make it, I used Clip Studio Paint.

Since this craft was intended for kids that could range from Kindergarten through Eighth Grade, I didn’t want to make the monster too scary for the little ones. I started the project by sketching out my friendly werewolf in Clip Studio Paint using a Layout Blue Pencil.

RULERS

Yes, I could freehand this sketch, but I used some of Clip Studio’s ruler tools to help me work more efficiently. I placed a Symmetry Ruler down the center of the page to quickly outline the monster using the standard G-Pen. Inking the left side automatically inks the right side. So you can draw things twice as fast.

In addition to the Symmetry Ruler, I used the Curve Ruler to trace the outline of the individual body parts. I use the Curve Ruler as a guide so my ink line is smooth and uniform, and doesn’t take long to draw. You just zip around that ruler like a car around a race track, and the brush settings takes care of the line weight.

The bonus benefit of using the Symmetry Ruler along with the Curve Ruler is that I only have to draw one of everything, and it’s duplicated (in reverse) on the opposite side of the page. Again, I’m getting a lot of this job done in half the time.

For the detail work, I turn off the rulers and just ink freehand. I prefer asymmetry for the details because it helps the illustration look more natural and hand-done.

Once all the details (and joint markings) are drawn in, the only thing left to do is print the illustration out and deliver it to my teacher friend for her to distribute to the kids.

And here are some of the paper dolls in progress during the after-school program.

I’ve been posting some process videos on YouTube, so if you’d like to see me work on this project at super-fast speed, here’s the video: