Inking The Red Skull and Reviewing The Pentel Pocket Brush Pen

I try to post most of the inking process videos from our YouTube channel here on the process blog, but I miss a few here and there. If you like this sort of stuff, just subscribe to our channel and you’ll never miss our dorky, art-related content such as the following ridiculousness.

 

RedSkullRevenge_01

Inking Sonic the Hedgehog (on paper) and Coloring it in Clip Studio Paint

Another lighthearted art demo. The Sonic movie comes out tomorrow, so I inked Sonic the Hedgehog traditionally, with brush pens, then pulled it into Clip Studio Paint to color. I talk a little bit about my technique and tools with Run Red Run while I work, but we also discuss video games, hedgehogs, and mustachioed plumbers.

I don’t post ALL of these art demos here on my process blog. So if you like this sort of thing, subscribe to our YouTube channel to make sure you don’t miss a post. -v

sonic_bw_to_color_dorse

Reviewing the Pilot Shinpitsu Bristle Brush Pens (and inking a Sleestak)

Yeah, maybe I buried the lede. I inked a Sleestak from The Land of the Lost with the Pilot Shinpitsu Bristle Brush Pens. I liked ’em. But if you wanna see ’em in action, just check out the video. And, besides the pen review, RunRedRun and I talk about ’70s Sci-Fi Kids TV hit, The Land of the Lost because why not?

PilotPens

Inking The Mummy

Time for another 6-minute video where I ink a monster and RunRedRun and I talk about stuff. This time, it’s mummies. Are they scary? What are their monster powers? Spoiler alert: We have no idea. But here’s me inking one anyway (with PIGMA Brush Pens and PITT Artist Pens).

Inking Khan

I’ve been uploading some quick, short inking/making videos on YouTube lately that show my process. Here’s the latest. Six-and-a-half minutes of inking Khan while my needle-felting friend Michelle and I talk about Star Trek. You can subscribe to the YouTube channel to see stuff like this every Monday and Thursday (time willing).

Inking The Headless Horseman

I’ve been trying to upload some quick inking/making videos on YouTube lately that show my process (albeit, at breakneck speeds). So here’s the latest. Seven-and-a-half minutes of inking the Headless Horseman while gabbing about our favorite versions of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

Happy Halloween (ten months early). -v

After-School Project: Making a Werewolf Paper Doll with Clip Studio Paint

I have a friend who is a grade school teacher and is always looking for creative activities for the kids in her after-school program. So every once in a while I make her a paper doll the kids can color, cut-out, and assemble. Since I did this near Halloween, I decided on a kid-friendly werewolf. And to make it, I used Clip Studio Paint.

Since this craft was intended for kids that could range from Kindergarten through Eighth Grade, I didn’t want to make the monster too scary for the little ones. I started the project by sketching out my friendly werewolf in Clip Studio Paint using a Layout Blue Pencil.

RULERS

Yes, I could freehand this sketch, but I used some of Clip Studio’s ruler tools to help me work more efficiently. I placed a Symmetry Ruler down the center of the page to quickly outline the monster using the standard G-Pen. Inking the left side automatically inks the right side. So you can draw things twice as fast.

In addition to the Symmetry Ruler, I used the Curve Ruler to trace the outline of the individual body parts. I use the Curve Ruler as a guide so my ink line is smooth and uniform, and doesn’t take long to draw. You just zip around that ruler like a car around a race track, and the brush settings takes care of the line weight.

The bonus benefit of using the Symmetry Ruler along with the Curve Ruler is that I only have to draw one of everything, and it’s duplicated (in reverse) on the opposite side of the page. Again, I’m getting a lot of this job done in half the time.

For the detail work, I turn off the rulers and just ink freehand. I prefer asymmetry for the details because it helps the illustration look more natural and hand-done.

Once all the details (and joint markings) are drawn in, the only thing left to do is print the illustration out and deliver it to my teacher friend for her to distribute to the kids.

And here are some of the paper dolls in progress during the after-school program.

I’ve been posting some process videos on YouTube, so if you’d like to see me work on this project at super-fast speed, here’s the video: