Inking The Sanderson Sisters (from Hocus Pocus)

Would you believe I’d never seen Hocus Pocus until this past Halloween? The movie’s 27 years old and I guess it just slipped under my radar somehow.

But this year, Run Red Run made me watch it because it’s one of her favorite Halloween movies. And you know what? I liked it. Liked it so much I inked this illustration of the Sanderson Sisters while we discussed the movie.

Here’s the process video of this Halloween Leftover.

And if you enjoyed the witches of Hocus Pocus, you might enjoy this creepy old witch house that Run Red Run and I built a few weeks ago. It’s our very first build like this, and we had a lot of fun. We’ll probably be doing more of these.

Inking Uncle Deadly (The Phantom of the Muppet Show)

This was a fun video to make. And not just because I got to draw one of my favorite scary muppets, Uncle Deadly.

And not just because Run Red Run and I got to talk about Muppets (which is always fun).

But this time, we’re also debuting a brand new experimental segment where SOMEONE ELSE does the inking. Have I got your curiosity piqued? Good. Watch the video and find out what I’m talking about:

Inking Muppets! Kermit the Frog and Fozzie Bear.

I know we usually ink monsters or villains (because they’re fun) but we’re lightening things up a touch today and inking Muppets!

Kermit the Frog and Fozzie Bear, up on stage, thrilling the crowd on open mic night at Chet’s Beef and Brew. Everybody’s gotta start somewhere! But you know with the talent these two have, they’re going places!

And while I ink Muppets, RunRedRun and I discuss inking, kazoos, and that one time we met a Muppeteer! I also spend most of the video trying to convince her to sing.

Plus, if you stick around ’til the end, I tossed some digital color on my inks. Here the video:

Inking Prince John (from Disney’s Robin Hood)

There’s this middle-era of Disney animation that I just love. One of the movies from that era is Disney’s Robin Hood.

The villain of that movie is the scheming Prince John, a lion (and lyin’) king that’s a pretender to his brother’s throne. But, as conniving as he is, he’s actually a pretty funny Disney villain.

So I inked him with a brush pen and finished with some ink washes, while RunRedRun and I discussed Disney movies and what we liked so much about the art style in Robin Hood. Here’s the video:

Inking A Skeleton Pirate (From the Pirates of the Caribbean Ride)

My friends and I love going to Disneyworld. But, honestly, I’ll wait until after the whole mask thing has passed…if it does.

Until then, I’ll have to settle for drawing skeleton pirates and talking about the Pirates of the Caribbean ride with Run Red Run.

If you miss riding the rides at Disney, or if you want to see me ink this skeleton pirate…or even if you just have 9 minutes to kill while your pizza cooks, here’s the link to the video.

Inking the Monster Cereal Mascots (Yummy Mummy and Fruit Brute) and trying out a Copic Gasenfude Brush Pen

When fall hits, you can always find Frankenberry, Count Chocula, and Boo Berry on the grocery store shelves.

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But their forgotten counterparts, Yummy Mummy and Fruit Brute, have been unemployed for decades.

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In this video, I ink up the monsters that lost their breakfast cereal endorsement deal, and talk about it with Run Red Run.

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And I try out a brush pen I’ve wanted to try for a while; the Copic Gasenfude Brush Pen. Did I like the pen? Sure. Did it cover my hands in ink smudges that led me to smudge ink all over my paper? You bet.

Inking Raphael (for a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Commission)

I like turtles. Do you like turtles? Everyone likes turtles.

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Despite that, I’d never really drawn a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle until a client commissioned one as part of a group project where 4 different cartoonists contributed a different turtle. I got Raphael.

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I had fun with it. And I had fun talking with RunRedRun about ninja turtles, inking, and the renaissance. Here’s the video if you’d like to listen in:

Inking The Green Goblin

Norman Osborn is a wealthy businessman, a doting father, and an evil super villain. Eh. Gotta take the good with the bad.

I inked a sketch of Green Goblin this week, and you can follow my process in the video below.

While I ink, I talk with my friend Run Red Run about cherished friendships, deadly enemies, inking, and Dave Wachter. Enjoy the video.

Inking (and coloring) Sesame Street Monsters

Can you tell me how to get to Sesame Street? Great. Now tell me how to get away from these creepy alien muppets.

I kid. I love these guys. But they did give me the creeps when I was five.

In this video, I ink these monsters (and maybe a surprise monster, too) and Run Red Run and I talk about Muppets and Frank Oz.

Making a Maze in Clip Studio Paint (for the National Cartoonists Society Activity Book))

I’m no mazologist (is that a word?), but I was asked to create a puzzle page for the National Cartoonists Society Activity Book. If I had to do it on paper, I might still be working on it. But Clip Studio Paint made it easy and quick. Oh, and I’ve added a link at the bottom letting you know where to download your own copy of the activity book!

Inking

This maze is packed with illustrations of my Untold Tales of Bigfoot characters. And since I know how to draw those guys, that’s where I started. I sketched in their shapes roughly in digital pencil, then used the Layer Color function to turn that sketch a light blue.

Then, on another layer, I inked with a brush tool. Doing it this way is low pressure since I can fix errors on the fly and get the work done much faster than I’d be able to with ink on paper.

Halftone Greys

Since this activity book will be a black-and-white publication and not color, I use Clip Studio Paint’s halftone dot patterns to add screen tones. The first step is to create a selection of where you want your dot pattern.

Then, from the pop-up menu, select the second-to-last option, New Tone. This brings up another pop-up that gives you options on the density and type of dot pattern you’d like to drop into the selection.

Once you pick one, click OK and the pattern appears on another layer, in a MASK that you can add to or subtract from— giving you the option to paint in (or remove) the dot pattern with ease.

Curve Rulers

Again, I’m not a maze-maker. So it took me a few (dozen) tries to digitally pencil out a path for Scout to take through the woods in his quest for Bigfoot. Doing it digitally made it easier to start over when I screwed up. But once the paths of the maze were set, I clicked the Layer Color option so I could turn the pencils blue and ink over them on another layer.

The lines of the maze aren’t ramrod straight or particularly smooth curves, but I used the Curve Rulers anyway because, besides helping you follow a designated path, they also help you keep a consistent line weight.

Drawing these lines freehand would’ve resulted — for me, at least — in inconsistent, bumpy lines that wouldn’t look very good. The Curve Ruler helped make the lines smooth and evenly weighted, but with a natural, hand-done feel.

Text Tool

For very simple typesetting like adding a title to this page, the Text Tool in Clip Studio Paint is a breeze. Just grab the text tool, plant the cursor where you want your text, and type it out. You can resize with the point size dropdown, or just grab a corner of the bounding box and stretch it to fit.

Eventually I used the font dropdown to change the font into something I thought fit better.

Finally, I used the Rounded Balloon tool in conjunction with the Text Tool to give Bigfoot and Scout something to say.

So that’s about it. Nothing too difficult. Just some very simple tools in Clip Studio Paint that make a relatively basic job a little easier and a bit quicker.

Now, the NCS Activity Book is packed with all kinds of puzzle pages from some of the most well-known cartoonists in the world: Sergio Aragones (MAD Magazine), Mo Willems (Don’t Let The Pigeon Drive The Bus), Jeff Keane (Family Circus), Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman (Zits), and many more. The pdf download is a pay-what-you-can deal of a lifetime and the proceeds go toward the NCS Foundation. You can find out more about that in this video as well as watch me put this Untold Tales of Bigfoot Maze together in Clip Studio Paint.