Covering A Health Issue (Ha! Pun!)

HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_01Here’s my latest cover for the Pittsburgh City Paper. They’re publishing their 2017 Health Issue this week, so Lisa the Art Director had me draw a kindly old doctor for the cover.

The Brief

Lisa gave me a few options to play with for the cover assignment, but they all centered around a doctor making a house call, so I tossed out a couple quick sketches. I toyed with the idea of having a young woman doctor with a modern feel, but the concept of making house calls is so quaint and outdated, I decided an old-timey doctor would fit better. The illustration was done in Clip Studio Paint, including these sketches.

HealthIssue2017Lisa liked the one on the doorstep, so we went with it. I only had a couple days, so the quicker we nail down an idea the better.

Side Note: One of the reasons it’s so fun to work with Lisa is that she has fun doing her job. She told me she kept flipping back and forth between my two sketches to make him dance. So I made a gif for her to enjoy. In fact, she just reminded me that I didn’t include it in this post, so I’m adding it just for her. : )

dancingdoc_dorse

Line

HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_03When I do work for the City Paper, I often use a style that tries to evoke retro comic book inks and colors. But, for this doctor piece, I wanted something a little softer, a little more storybook. So I decided I’d use one of the Clip Studio pencil tools for the linework.

Flats

HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_02aEven though I’m trying to avoid a comic book look, I did begin the coloring process with the standard comic book practice of laying down the flat colors. I used a standard, smooth, round brush for this.

Background

I started with the background first knowing it’d be relatively simple. The clouds in the sky were done with a low-opacity watercolor brush. The houses and trees in the distance were just blocked in with a chalk brush (you can see the rough edges), then blended into a soft blue.

HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_04I used that same chalk brush for most of the rest of the illustration, including the work on this picket fence and grass. The sweeping crossbeam on that fence was drawn with the assistance of Clip Studio’s curve ruler. It’s an indispensable tool I use with almost any image that has long, smooth curves.

Sunbeams

I had this idea about kitschy lighting in the background: sunbeams radiating out and upward like vintage product packaging for butter or oranges or some other wholesome food.HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_05I flipped the sunbeam layer on and off a few dozen times before finally deciding to keep it. I think it helps give the illustration more of an old-fashioned feel.

Modeling The Figure

The really fun part was adding all the highlights and shadows with the chalk brush. I made this animated gif to show the progression from flat color to fully-rendered.HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_06Here’s another reason doing the background first is helpful. The color of the highlights were pulled directly from the sunlight behind him. Same thing with the shadows. This way the figure looks like he belongs in the scene. The rosy reds on his cheeks and nose don’t really exist in the background, but they’re there to give him that friendly, cherubic glow.

Text

HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_07I hand-lettered the words on this cover (based on existing typefaces) because I didn’t want them to look too perfect, but I needed them to be clean and readable at a distance. For “Health Issue” I added a slightly offset drop-shadow to really give it some oomph.

Grass and Shrubs

I ran a really rough chalk brush over the lawn a few dozen times to give it a little more texture. The bushes were done with a watercolor bristle brush because I wanted the slightly ovoid stroke of a brush for the leaves, rather than the blunt mark of a chalk tool.HealthIssueProcess_VinceDorse_08I handed the piece in and then realized I’d forgotten to draw the bottom beam on the picket fence. So I fixed it and re-sent the final-final illustration to Lisa. This is why I usually sit with an illustration for a full day before handing it in — so I can catch some of my mistakes before the client does.

Finished Cover

CP_WithMasthead

And here’s the finished cover with the masthead added by the City Paper. If you’re interested in the state of health care and how it effects Pittsburghers, feel free to zip over and read the digital version online. -v

Chef: Card Game Art Process in Clip Studio Paint

I recently finished illustrating a series of cards for the game Foray, an expansion set to the successful 2-player game, Morels from Two Lanterns Games. The games are mushroom-themed, and so most of the drawings revolve around foraging for, cooking, or eating mushrooms.

Chef_process_VinceDorseMost of the cards have an interesting twist to them, and it was a lot of fun working on cards like that panther or dragon (above). But honestly, they were relatively simple compared to the Chef card with all of its perspective, varying surface textures, and staging. Luckily, using Clip Studio Paint made the job a little easier.

Perspective Rulers

Chef_process_VinceDorseI scribbled out my initial sketch in Clip Studio. I roughed it in loosely, just trying to get an idea of where the drawing was headed. Then I set up my perspective rulers. As you can see, I was in the ballpark, but not quite close enough. So using the rulers and a pencil tool, I redrew the kitchen in proper perspective (below).

Chef_process_VinceDorseThat’s better. I also used the perspective ruler to set up some guidelines for the brickwork and even the metal grates on the stove top.

Figure Rulers, Curve Rulers

Chef_process_VinceDorseToggling off the perspective rulers, I used the Clip Studio’s figure rulers to help me draw all those circles of the pots, pans, and jars. The curve rulers were used to make the smooth, curved outlines of the pot handles, bowls, jars, and other various objects. Then, since the client requested something more akin to realism than cartooning, I used a reference model to help me sketch out a more realistic figure. There is no ‘chef ruler’ so I had to do that freehand.

Colors

Chef_process_VinceDorseStill in Clip Studio, I painted in the flats with a smooth, round brush. The client had very specific references for this kitchen, so all of those details (the fittings, tiles, bricks — even what the chef is wearing and the color of her hair) were specifically called for. Now you see what I mean? Compared to this kitchen, drawing that panther on a rock was a piece of cake!

Chef_process_VinceDorse06Now it’s time to turn up the heat and add the highlights, shadows, and surface texture of all the various objects around the room.

Highlights, Shadows, and Texture

Chef_process_VinceDorseI started detailing with the chef. I used some textured brushes to indicate folds in her clothing, and smoothed things out with a blender brush. There was some soft airbrushing in there too. Next, the brickwork.

Chef_process_VinceDorseFor the brickwork, I first ramped up the darks and lights to help with the illusion of depth. On top of all that, I used a chalk brush to paint in rough brick texture, changing up the colors every so often for variety.

Chef_process_VinceDorseThere were all kinds of surfaces in the drawing. Brass, copper, stainless steel, tile, brick, wood, etc. Clip Studio Paint has a nice selection of standard brushes that are great for rendering surface texture, but I’ve also collected and created a bunch of custom brushes over the years that helped me finish up this detailing. If you’re looking to expand your tool set, you can find custom brushes created by Clip Studio artists all over the internet, and they’re easy to install. So give it a try.

Chef_process_VinceDorseSome of the finishing touches I put in with the airbrush tool: steam rising from the hot pots and pans, glints of light reflecting off metal surfaces, cast shadow under the table falling on the tile floor. Then it was just a matter of making some tonal adjustments and the illustration was done.

Sketch to Final

Chef_process_VinceDorse11This gif takes you through my entire process. All of it was done in Clip Studio Paint (with a brief stop in Photoshop afterward to convert to CMYK for the printer). With a selection of tools and rulers so robust, you rarely need to leave Clip Studio to bring an illustration from sketch to finish. -v